Wattie Karawara Wandjina paintings

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Wattie Karrawara wandjina Bark painting

Wattie Karawara
Bark painting

Wattie Karawara is a famous Wandjina painter form the Kimberley in Western Australia. He was one of the pioneer commercial wandjina painters. The aim of this article is to assist readers in identifying if their a bark painting / slate is by Wattie Karawara by comparing  examples of his work.

 

 

 

If you have a Wattie Karawara bark painting or slate to sell please contact me. If you just want to know what your Wattie Karawara painting is worth to me please feel free to send me a Jpeg because I would love to see it.

 

 

 

Bark painting of a wandjina by KARRUWARA WATTIE Wattie’s Wandjina figures are drawn with a full body. The figures are drawn in an inland wandjina style with very large head-dresses which look more fan shaped than hallo shaped. Wandjina takes many forms according to the exact location and tribal group that are its custodians and Watties images represent those from his area. The bodies are usually covered with red. His wandjina faces vary but often don’t have eye lashes and sometimes have eye brows. Watties Wandjinas have small eyes, nose, and delicate hands and feet.

Wattie Karawara was born in the Hunter River basin in the Kimberley around 1910. In 1921 during his youth, two shipwrecked sailors stole a canoe from a clansman and, in an attempt to cross the Hunter River, became swamped. On their return to shore, the owner of the canoe speared and killed them. As a consequence the police detained four women and two men, of whom Wattie was one. After a period in Wyndam jail and a trial in Perth, Wattie Karawara was eventually released as a minor. He spent nearly 20 years in Perth before returning to his home at Mowanjum.

In Mowanjum, Wattie lived with his uncle Mickey Bungkuni a senior Wunambal elder who painted wandjina and taught Wattie to paint. There are a few early examples of Watties works collected by anthropologists before 1970. The majority of his paintings were done in the early 70’s. Wattie Karawara and Charlie Numbulmoore were among the first artists to emerge as individual artistic identities prior to the 1970’s. Although most of watties works are on bark he also painted coolamon and on slate.

Wattie late in his career did a series of watercolours and painted non wandjina themes on traditional dishes (coolamon) and carved boab nuts.

 Wattie Karawara Wandjina Images

The following is not a complete list of works but gives a very good idea of this artists style and variety.


KARRAWARA WATTIE
 Wandjina painting by KARRUWARA WATTIEBark painting depicting a wandina spirit by WATTIE faded bark painting by wattieKARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE Wattie Karawara paintingKARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE painted coolamonCoolamon dish painted by KARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE wattie karawara wanjina painting on slate

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Waigin Djanghara Wandjina Bark Paintings

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Waigin Djangara Bark Painting

Waigin Djanghara
Bark Painting

Waigin Djanghara is an Aboriginal Artist who painted depictions of Wandjina in the Kimberley of Western Australia.  The aim of this article is to assist readers in identifying if their bark painting is by Waigin Jangarra by comparing  examples of his work. He painted in an Wandjina Style.

 

If you have a Waigin Djanghara  bark painting to sell please contact me. If you just want to know what your Waigin Djanghara painting is worth to me please feel free to send me a Jpeg.  I would love to see it.

 

 

 

Djanghara WaiginWaigin Djanghara paints Wandjina with round eyes but the eyes are smaller and the eye lashes are thick compared to Charlie Numbulmoore. The face of his Wandjina are white while the body below the armpits covered in dots that represent the rain. His paintings in general are similar but finer than those of Lily Karadada and almost identical to his wifes Ignatia Djanghara. His paintings are often of just Wandjina or two wandjina one above the other. He sometimes also incorporate totemic animals or shields. His major Totemic animals are the turtle snake and dugong. The pigments on his early barks are quite fragile as he did not use fixatives. One common themes in his works though is a snake drooped just above the wandjina head.

Wandjina paintings showing the whole body are less common bigger and more desirable than those of just head and shoulders. Waigin’s images of Wandina on bark are either icon-like in shape, with rounded sides, narrower at the top than the base or square. He has also been known to paint barks with a dugong and dugongs shield and turtle.

Waigin Djanghara started painting regularly in 1980’s  after Warringarri Aboriginal Arts had been established in Kununurra.   Waigin Jangarra taught his wife to paint and they worked together as did Rosie and Louis Karedada and Lily Karedada and Jack Karedada. They gathered their ochres from the local creek beds and used charcoal to create black paint.

DJANGHARA WAIGAN Little is known about Waigin’s childhood and youth but it is very likely he started his painting in rock shelters repainting the wandjinas there. He became prominent at Kalumburu in the mid 1980’s where he lived next to the Benedictine mission that had been established 25 kilometres from the northern coast in 1907. At Mowanjum the local authorities had strong control over the Woonambal landowners and taught them that their tribal customs and beliefs were at odds with Christianity.

Waigin Djanghara, who was born around 1925, was already in his late 50’s when he first began creating bark paintings for commercial sale. He was responsible for maintaining the remnants of these spirit ancestors, which are said to have lain down in caves and turned into paintings on the cave walls after their time on the earth.

Though it is not known when  Waigan or his wife died these two wonderful old Woonambool elders left a priceless legacy.  Wandjina images are amongst the most powerful of all Aboriginal art.

Along with many other Kimberley Artists who did bark paintings, there is not a lot of information available about Waigan Djanghara.  If anyone knows more information about the biography of Waigan,  please contact me as I would like to add it to this article.

Waigin Djanghara Bark painting images

The following bark painting are not a complete list of works but give a good feel for the variety and style of this artist.


WAIGAN
djanghara_waigan-wDjanghara WaiginDJANGHARA WAIGIN djanghara-waiganDJANGHARA WAIGAN Djanghara WaiginDjanghara Waigin Djanghara Waigin DJANGHARA WAIGIN Djanghara Waigin Djanghara Waigin DJANGHARA WAIGAN Djanghara Waigin Waigin DjangharaDJANGHARA WAIGIN Djanghara Waigin DJANGHARA WAIGAN DJANGHARA WAIGINDJANGHARA WAIGIN Waigin Djangara DJANGHARA WAIGAN WAIGIN DJANGHARA WAIGAN WAIGAN

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Ignatia Djanghara Wandjina Painter

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Djanghara Ignatia

Ignatia Djanghara
Bark painting

Ignatia Djanghara is an Aboriginal Artist who painted depictions of Wandjina in the Kimberley of Western Australia.  The aim of this article is to assist readers in identifying if their bark painting is by Ignatia Djanghara by comparing  examples of her work.

 

 

 

If you have a Ignatia Djanghara  bark painting to sell please contact me. If you just want to know what your Ignatia Djanghara painting is worth to me please feel free to send me a Jpeg.  I would love to see it.

 

 

Ignatia Djanghara paints Wandjina with round eyes but the eyes are smaller and the eye lashes are thick compared to Charlie Numbulmoore. The face of his Wandjina are white while the body below the armpits covered in dots that represent the rain. Her paintings in general are similar but finer than those of Lily Karadada and almost identical to her husbands Waigin Djanghara. Her paintings are often of just Wandjina but sometimes also incorporate totemic animals or stick figures. Her major Totemic animals are the turtle and snake. Wandjina paintings showing the whole body are less common bigger and more desirable than those of just head and shoulders. Ignatia’s images of Wandjinas on bark are typically icon-like in shape, with rounded sides, narrower at the top than the base. The spirits are often depicted with bark buckets, unique to the Kimberley region.

DJANGHARA IGNATIA Ignatia Djanghara does Wandjina Painting on bark mainly but has also painted on traditional spath container. Ignatia Djanghara started painting regularly in 1985  after Warringarri Aboriginal Arts had been established in Kununurra.   Ignatia and her husband Waigan worked together as did Rosie and Louis Karedada and Lily Karedada and Jack Karedada. They gathered their ochres from the local creek beds and, like their counterparts in Arnhem Land used charcoal to create black paint.

Little is known about Ignatia’s childhood and youth. She first became prominent at Kalumburu in the mid 1980’s where she lived next to the Benedictine mission that had been established 25 kilometres from the northern coast in 1907. At Mowanjum the local authorities had strong control over the Woonambal landowners and taught them that their tribal customs and beliefs were at odds with Christianity.

Ignatia, who was born around 1930, was already in her mid 50’s when she first began creating bark paintings related to the Wandjina. She and her husband were responsible for maintaining the remnants of these spirit ancestors which are said to have lain down in caves and turned into paintings on the cave walls after their time on the earth.

Though it is not known when Ignatia and Waigan passed away these two wonderful old Woonambool elders left a priceless legacy.  Wandjina images are amongst the most powerful of all Aboriginal art. They are certain to continue to grow in value as they are prized and loved by those fortunate enough to live with them.

Along with many other Kimberley Artists who did bark paintings, there is not a lot of information available about Ignatia Djanghara.  If anyone knows more information about the biography of Ignatia,  please contact me as I would like to add it to this article.

 

Ignatia Djanghara Bark painting images

The following bark painting are not a complete list of works but give a good feel for the variety and style of this artist.


DJANGHARA IGNATIA
Djanghara Ignatia DJANGHARA IGNATIA DJANGHARA IGNATIA DJANGHARA IGNATIA Ignatia JangarraDJANGHARA IGNATIADJANGHARA IGNATIADJANGHARA IGNATIA DJANGHARA IGNATIADJANGHARA IGNATIADJANGHARA IGNATIA DJANGHARA IGNATIA 1Djanghara Ignatia Ignatia JangarraIgnatia DjangharaDjanghara Ignatia Djanghara Ignatia

          

If this post has been informative please take the time and make the effort to share it on social media. By clicking any of the share buttons below you create a link from your social site to this article. Links are what google uses to calculate what information on the web is useful. By sharing this article you are letting google know you found my article / images of some value. Thanks!

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Lily Karadada Wandjina painting

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Lily Karadada Bark Painting

Lily Karadada
Bark Painting

Lily Karadada is one of the last of a generation of Wandjina painters who painted on bark. She was wife to another great bark painter Jack Keradada. She is probably the most prolific Wandjina painter on bark.  The aim of this article is to assist readers in identifying if their aboriginal bark painting is by Lily Karadada by comparing  examples of her work.

If you have a Lily Karadada bark painting to sell please contact me. If you just want to know what your Lily Karadada painting is worth to me please feel free to send me a Jpeg because I would love to see it.

 

 

KAREDADA LILI Lily paints Wandjina with round eyes but the eyes are smaller and the eye lashes are thick compared to Charlie Numbulmoore. The face of her Wandjina are white while the body below the armpits covered in dots that represent the rain. Her paintings are often not just of Wandjina but also incorporate totemic animals or stick figures. Both the outlines and dotting in Lilys work is far more precise than the vigorous, gestured marks of sister in law Rosie Karadada.

Lily does Wandjina Painting on bark but also on traditional spath containers. Lily continues to paint today but for the past couple of decades has painted only on Canvass.

Lily was born of Woonambal parents in her father’s country, Woomban-go-wangoorr, near the Prince Regent River in the East Kimberley. Lily belongs to the Jirrengar (owlet nighthar) moiety and her specific totems are the turkey, possum and white cockatoo.  She is recognised as being one of the major artists of the Kimberley region and has exhibited her work extensively.

Lily Karadada Wandjina Painting Images

The following are not a complete list of works but give a very good idea of the artists style and variety.


KAREDADA
17436830504062446268738682Figure10Karadada lilyKARADEDA LILY KARADEDA LILYKAREDADA LILI KAREDADA LILYKAREDADA LILYKAREDADA LILY KAREDADA LILY KAREDADA LILY Karedada LilyKERADADA LILY KERADADA LILY Lily_KAREDADA

If this post has been informative please take the time and make the effort to share it on social media. By clicking any of the share buttons below you create a link from your social site to this article. Links are what google uses to calculate what information on the web is useful. By sharing this article you are letting google know you found my article / images of some value. Thanks!

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Wattie Karrawara Wandjina bark painting

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Wattie Karrawara wandjina Bark painting

Wattie Karrawara
Bark painting

Wattie Karrawara is a famous Wandjina painter form the Kimberley in Western Australia. He was one of the pioneer commercial wandjina painters. The aim of this article is to assist readers in identifying if their a bark painting / slate is by Wattie Karrawara by comparing  examples of his work.

If you have a Wattie Karrawara bark painting or slate to sell please contact me. If you just want to know what your Wattie Karrawara painting is worth to me please feel free to send me a Jpeg because I would love to see it.

 

 

 

 

Bark painting of a wandjina by KARRUWARA WATTIE Wattie’s Wandjina figures are drawn with a full body. The figures are drawn in an inland wandjina style with very large head-dresses which look more fan shaped than hallo shaped. Wandjina takes many forms according to the exact location and tribal group that are its custodians and Watties images represent those from his area. The bodies are usually covered with red. His wandjina faces vary but often don’t have eye lashes and sometimes have eye brows. Watties Wandjinas have small eyes, nose, and delicate hands and feet.

Wattie Karrawara was born in the Hunter River basin in the Kimberley around 1910. In 1921 during his youth, two shipwrecked sailors stole a canoe from a clansman and, in an attempt to cross the Hunter River, became swamped. On their return to shore, the owner of the canoe speared and killed them. As a consequence the police detained four women and two men, of whom Wattie was one. After a period in Wyndam jail and a trial in Perth, Wattie Karrawara was eventually released as a minor. He spent nearly 20 years in Perth before returning to his home at Mowanjum.

In Mowanjum, Wattie lived with his uncle Mickey Bungkuni a senior Wunambal elder who painted wandjina and taught Wattie to paint. There are a few early examples of Watties works collected by anthropologists before 1970. The majority of his paintings were done in the early 70’s. Wattie Karruwara and Charlie Numbulmoore were among the first artists to emerge as individual artistic identities prior to the 1970’s. Although most of watties works are on bark he also painted coolamon and on slate.

Wattie late in his career did a series of watercolours and painted non wandjina themes on traditional dishes (coolamon) and carved boab nuts.

 Wattie Karrawara Wandjina Images

The following is not a complete list of works but gives a very good idea of this artists style and variety.


KARRAWARA WATTIE
 Wandjina painting by KARRUWARA WATTIEBark painting depicting a wandina spirit by WATTIE faded bark painting by wattieKARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIEKARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE painted coolamonCoolamon dish painted by KARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE

 If this post has been informative please take the time and make the effort to share it on social media. By clicking any of the share buttons below you create a link from your social site to this article. Links are what google uses to calculate what information on the web is useful. By sharing this article you are letting google know you found my article / images of some value. Thanks!

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Wattie Karruwara Wandjina bark painting

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Wattie Karrawara Bark painting

Wattie Karruwara

Wattie Karruwara is a famous Wandjina painter form the Kimberley in Western Australia. He was one of the pioneer commercial wandjina painters. The aim of this article is to assist readers in identifying if their a bark painting / slate is by Wattie Karruwara by comparing  examples of his work.

 

If you have a Wattie Karruwara bark painting or slate to sell please contact me. If you just want to know what your Wattie Karruwara painting is worth to me please feel free to send me a Jpeg because I would love to see it.

 

 

KARRUWARA WATTIE Wattie’s Wandjina figures are drawn with a full body. The figures are drawn in an inland wandjina style with very large head-dresses which look more fan shaped than hallo shaped. Wandjina takes many forms according to the exact location and tribal group that are its custodians and Watties images represent those from his area. The bodies are usually covered with red. His wandjina faces vary but often don’t have eye lashes and sometimes have eye brows. Watties Wandjinas have small eyes, nose, and delicate hands and feet.

Wattie Karruwara was born in the Hunter River basin in the Kimberley around 1910. In 1921 during his youth, two shipwrecked sailors stole a canoe from a clansman and, in an attempt to cross the Hunter River, became swamped. On their return to shore, the owner of the canoe speared and killed them. As a consequence the police detained four women and two men, of whom Wattie was one. After a period in Wyndam jail and a trial in Perth, Wattie Karruwara was eventually released as a minor. He spent nearly 20 years in Perth before returning to his home at Mowanjum.

In Mowanjum, Wattie lived with his uncle Mickey Bungkuni a senior Wunambal elder who painted wandjina and taught Wattie to paint. There are a few early examples of Watties works collected by anthropologists before 1970. The majority of his paintings were done in the early 70’s. Wattie Karruwara and Charlie Numbulmoore were among the first artists to emerge as individual artistic identities prior to the 1970’s. Although most of watties works are on bark he also painted coolamon and on slate.

Wattie late in his career did a series of watercolours and painted non wandjina themes on traditional dishes (coolamon) and carved boab nuts.

 Wattie Karruwara Wandjina Images

The following is not a complete list of works but gives a very good idea of this artists style and variety.


KARRAWARA WATTIE
 KARRUWARA WATTIEKARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIEKARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIEKARRUWARA WATTIE KarruwaraKARRUWARA WATTIE KARRUWARA WATTIE Karruwara Wattie 15 k Soth Lon 15 Karruwara Wattie 18 k Soth Lon 15

 If this post has been informative please take the time and make the effort to share it on social media. By clicking any of the share buttons below you create a link from your social site to this article. Links are what google uses to calculate what information on the web is useful. By sharing this article you are letting google know you found my article / images of some value. Thanks!

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Lily Karedada Wandjina Painting

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Lily Karedada Bark Painting

Lily Karedada
Bark Painting

Lily Karedada is one of the last of a generation of Wandjina painters who painted on bark. She was wife to another great bark painter Jack Keradada. She is probably the most prolific Wandjina painter on bark.  The aim of this article is to assist readers in identifying if their aboriginal bark painting is by Lily Karedada by comparing  examples of her work.

If you have a Lily Karedada bark painting to sell please contact me. If you just want to know what your Lily Karedada painting is worth to me please feel free to send me a Jpeg because I would love to see it.

 

 

KAREDADA LILI Lily paints Wandjina with round eyes but the eyes are smaller and the eye lashes are thick compared to Charlie Numbulmoore. The face of her Wandjina are white while the body below the armpits covered in dots that represent the rain. Her paintings are often not just of Wandjina but also incorporate totemic animals or stick figures. Both the outlines and dotting in Lilys work is far more precise than the vigorous, gestured marks of sister in law Rosie Karedada.

Lily does Wandjina Painting on bark but also on traditional spath containers. Lily continues to paint today but for the past couple of decades has painted only on Canvass.

Lily was born of Woonambal parents in her father’s country, Woomban-go-wangoorr, near the Prince Regent River in the East Kimberley. Lily belongs to the Jirrengar (owlet nighthar) moiety and her specific totems are the turkey, possum and white cockatoo.  She is recognised as being one of the major artists of the Kimberley region and has exhibited her work extensively.

Lily Karedada Wandjina Painting Images

The following are not a complete list of works but give a very good idea of the artists style and variety


KAREDADA
17436830504062446268738682Figure10Karadada lilyKARADEDA LILY KARADEDA LILYKAREDADA LILI KAREDADA LILYKAREDADA LILYKAREDADA LILY KAREDADA LILY KAREDADA LILY Karedada LilyKERADADA LILY KERADADA LILY Lily_KAREDADA

If this post has been informative please take the time and make the effort to share it on social media. By clicking any of the share buttons below you create a link from your social site to this article. Links are what google uses to calculate what information on the web is useful. By sharing this article you are letting google know you found my article / images of some value. Thanks!

 

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