Aboriginal Art lesson plan

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The following free Aboriginal Art lesson plan and Aboriginal Bark Painting worksheets are designed for students in years 4 to 6. Please feel free to use the attached Aboriginal Art lesson plan and adjust the lessons to suit your class environment.

 

Six Aboriginal Art lesson plan Worksheets

Click on the image for a easy to print version

 

Aboriginal art teachers resource BARK PAINTING TURTLE WORKSHEETABORIGINAL art for kids BARK PAINTING BARRAMUNDI WORKSHEETAboriginal art teachers resource BARK PAINTING CROCODILE WORKSHEET

Aboriginal Art lesson plan BROLGA WORKSHEETAboriginal Art lesson plan KANGAROO WORKSHEETAboriginal Art lesson plan Lizard WORKSHEET

 

Aboriginal Art lesson plan X-RAY Aboriginal Bark Painting 

STUDENT OUTCOMES

The student:

  • recognises the importance of contributions made by Aboriginal artists;
  • considers popular traditional and contemporary arts, including those from other times and places;
  • understands how Aboriginal arts contribute to the arts in Australian society;
  • gains an understanding that there are a variety of Aboriginal Art Styles from different regions and language groups.
  • gains knowledge of the X Ray style of painting from the Oenpelli Region of Arnhem Land

TEACHING RESOURCES/ MATERIALS:

Collection of Bark Painting Pictures

Bark Painting Design Worksheets

Red, Black, yellow and brown sharpened coloured pencils

IMPLEMENTATION:

Whole Class.

  • Show students pictures of the Aboriginal Bark Paintings and Rock paintings from the Oenpelli region.
  • Explain to students that some of Australia’s Rock art is older than the pyramids or Stone Henge.  Some Rock Paintings are believed to depict mega Fauna that has been extinct for 30,000 years
  • Explain how aboriginal artists traditionally drew animals as though they could be seen through (just like an X-Ray) and explain this is an artist method of showing an animal is depicted is three dimensionally.
  • Show examples of Xray bark paintings from picture collection
  • .Ask students what main colours are used in traditional x ray paintings and why these colours are used.
  • Show examples of different styles of rarrk line work
  • Discuss the types of markings (Rarrk) – model how they can be drawn.
  • Introduce the Bark Painting Worksheet and Model how to complete/ decorate the animal depicted.
  • Using the printed Worksheets ask the students to  further segment the animal design. Then use only parallel lines or cross hatching (Rarrk) to fill in the animal design sections. Small blocks of colour and dots are also acceptable. Traditionally no more than four colours of earthy tones should be used.
  • Children can choose from the six different animals worksheets supplied.
  • Remind children to use traditional colours and drawing techniques to complete their own x-ray design. The bones in the spine should be left white.
  • At end of the lesson – share designs and compare to Traditional Artist.

 

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

X-Ray style Aboriginal bark painting was traditionally painted on cave walls.

It is at least 7000 years old but probably much older.

The animals depicted are often totem animals sacred to the painter or animals important in an ancestral story.

Traditionally Red and Yellow were made from Ochre, White from Clay and Black from charcoal.

Bark Design Info:

Backbones are traditionally left white with small sections coloured in.

Rarrk (Lines) are fine, delicate and are parallel

Use different cross hatching/ line designs for each section.

 

Free Teachers Resource Aboriginal Art Bark Painting Activity for Kids

Free Art Lesson Plan

Teachers Resource

Aboriginal Art Activity

Aboriginal Art Worksheet

Bark Painting Worksheets

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Aboriginal art teachers resource

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The following free Aboriginal art teachers resource and Aboriginal Bark Painting worksheets are designed for students in years 4 to 6. Please feel free to use the attached Aboriginal art teachers resource and adjust the lessons to suit your class environment.

 

Six Aboriginal Bark Painting Worksheets

Click on the image for a easy to print version

Aboriginal art teachers resource BARK PAINTING TURTLE WORKSHEETABORIGINAL art for kids BARK PAINTING BARRAMUNDI WORKSHEETAboriginal art teachers resource BARK PAINTING CROCODILE WORKSHEET

ABORIGINAL art for kids BARK PAINTING BROLGA WORKSHEETAboriginal art teachers resource BARK PAINTING KANGAROO WORKSHEETABORIGINAL art for kids BARK PAINTING LIZARD WORKSHEET

Aboriginal art teachers resource X-RAY Aboriginal Bark Painting 

STUDENT OUTCOMES

The student:

  • recognises the importance of contributions made by Aboriginal artists;
  • considers popular traditional and contemporary arts, including those from other times and places;
  • understands how Aboriginal arts contribute to the arts in Australian society;
  • gains an understanding that there are a variety of Aboriginal Art Styles from different regions and language groups.
  • gains knowledge of the X Ray style of painting from the Oenpelli Region of Arnhem Land

TEACHING RESOURCES/ MATERIALS:

Collection of Bark Painting Pictures

Bark Painting Design Worksheets

Red, Black, yellow and brown sharpened coloured pencils

IMPLEMENTATION:

Whole Class.

  • Show students pictures of the Aboriginal Bark Paintings and Rock paintings from the Oenpelli region.
  • Explain to students that some of Australia’s Rock art is older than the pyramids or Stone Henge.  Some Rock Paintings are believed to depict mega Fauna that has been extinct for 30,000 years
  • Explain how aboriginal artists traditionally drew animals as though they could be seen through (just like an X-Ray) and explain this is an artist method of showing an animal is depicted is three dimensionally.
  • Show examples of Xray bark paintings from picture collection
  • .Ask students what main colours are used in traditional x ray paintings and why these colours are used.
  • Show examples of different styles of rarrk line work
  • Discuss the types of markings (Rarrk) – model how they can be drawn.
  • Introduce the Bark Painting Worksheet and Model how to complete/ decorate the animal depicted.
  • Using the printed Worksheets ask the students to  further segment the animal design. Then use only parallel lines or cross hatching (Rarrk) to fill in the animal design sections. Small blocks of colour and dots are also acceptable. Traditionally no more than four colours of earthy tones should be used.
  • Children can choose from the six different animals worksheets supplied.
  • Remind children to use traditional colours and drawing techniques to complete their own x-ray design. The bones in the spine should be left white.
  • At end of the lesson – share designs and compare to Traditional Artist.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

X-Ray style Aboriginal bark painting was traditionally painted on cave walls.

It is at least 7000 years old but probably much older.

The animals depicted are often totem animals sacred to the painter or animals important in an ancestral story.

Traditionally Red and Yellow were made from Ochre, White from Clay and Black from charcoal.

Bark Design Info:

Backbones are traditionally left white with small sections coloured in.

Rarrk (Lines) are fine, delicate and are parallel

Use different cross hatching/ line designs for each section.

 

 

 

Free Teachers Resource Aboriginal Art Bark Painting Activity for Kids

Free Art Lesson Plan

Teachers Resource

Aboriginal Art Activity

Aboriginal Art Worksheet

Bark Painting Worksheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Aboriginal art from Oenpelli

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Aboriginal art from Oenpelli

 

Aboriginal art from Oenpelli stems directly from a long history of rock painting. This article describes the features and designs found in Aboriginal art from Oenpelli and provides links to 32 major Oenpelli Bark Painting Artists.

Commonly the background of Aboriginal art from Oenpelli has been covered by a reddish Ochre that has been rubbed in. Sometimes the scrapped surface may be left the colour it assumed when it was scorched and straightened over a fire. Bark painting from this region were originally done inside shelters made of bark during the wet season or as rock painting.

 

I buy Aboriginal art from Oenpelli and if you want to sell Aboriginal art from Oenpelli I would love to see it. If you have a bark painting and just want to know what it is worth please feel free to send me a jpeg.

Much of the Aboriginal Art from Oenpelli was sold through the C.M.S or christian mission society. Local artists would bring in artworks and leave them for the mission to sell and return sometimes months later to pick up their money. Early CMS pieces have chalk or black marker inventory numbers and later they made labels and wrote down details.

Oenpelli Bark PaintingThe design typically consists of a single figure or a group of figures. The design is boldly outlined in white and stands out clearly from the background. The figures on a bark Painting can be some of the most dynamic and visually intriguing found in Aboriginal Art.

Though there is very little of background detail, the design is often filled in with crosshatching. These figures are distinguished by their roundness and quality of movement. Some bark painting form Oenpelli exhibit a unique x ray technique whereby internal organs – usually of animals fish or pregnant women are depicted. This x-ray style of art is a way Aboriginal Art represent the whole spiritual being on a 2 dimensional surface and not just the beings surface. In some old rock painting it is believed the spirit itself came to rest on the rock and left the depiction of its image. It is also the reason that Oenpelli bark painting are sometimes called X-Ray Bark Painting or x-ray aboriginal art.

Representations of attenuated matchstick figures called Mimi spirits are also found primarily in aboriginal art from Oenpelli.

Aboriginal art from Oenpelli Artists include:

 

Aboriginal art from Oenpelli depicting 3 spiritsJimmy Midjaw Midjaw | Mick Kubarkku

Lofty Nadjamerrek | Paddy Compass Namatbara

Dick Murramurra | Nym Djimurrgurr

January Nanganyari | Balirr Balirr

Rurrkula  | Nicholas

Wagbara | Madagarlgarl |  Yirawala

Curly Bardkadubbu  | Mandidja

Djambalula  | Guymala

Paddy Captain Jambuwal

Crusoe Kuningbal | Wally Mandarrk | Yuwunyuwun Murrawarr

Bobby Ngainjmirra  |  Peter Marralwanga

Naiyombolmi  Spider Namirrki | Anchor Wurrkidj

Joshua Wrrongu | George Djaykurrnga

Peter Nabarlambarl | Jimmy Ngainjmirra

Aboriginal art from OenpelliThe Oenpelli region includes Crocker Island which is home to some of the greatest figurative aboriginal art. The figures on Crocker Island bark Painting are extremely fluid and full of power and mystery.

The Oenpelli region reaches from the East Alligator River to the liverpool Rivers and includes the Coboug Peninsula and Crocker Island and Gouldburn Islands.

Forest plaines which flood in the wet season border the rivers and lagoons which teem with fish. The main settlement is Oenpelli Mission which is about 100 kilometres from the coast near the alligator River. Although as a cattle station it dates back to 1906 it first became the site of a church mission society in 1925. Nowadays aboriginal life centres on the mission station, where cattle are raised and crops are grown.

The Aboriginals of Oenpelli are organised into tribes rather than the smaller clans. Clans commonly trace matrilineal descent. Among them are the Gunwinggu and the Maung. In the Western region occurs the rocky escarpment of the Arnhem land plateau, fissured by chasms and dotted with caves. Evidence of human occupation as long as 20 thousand years ago is reflected in the rock painting. It is one of the oldest living tribal art traditions on earth.

If this post has been informative please take the time and make the effort to share it on social media. By clicking any of the share buttons below you create a link from your social site to this article. Links are what google uses to calculate what information on the web is useful. By sharing this article you are letting google know you found my article / images of some value. Thanks!

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Tribal shields from Aboriginal Australia

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Shield Parrying se aus soth12 33

Aboriginal tribal shield from South east Australia

 

 

Aboriginal tribal shield come in numerous different forms depending on the tribe that made them and there function. Broadly speaking aboriginal tribal shield can be divided into 2 main types, Parrying and Broad shields. Parrying shields were used to parry blows from a club where as broad shields were used to block spears.

I BUY ABORIGINAL TRIBAL SHIELDS

The value of a aboriginal tribal shield depends on the quality of the shield, the age, artistic beauty but mostly the rarity. As a rule of thumb the tribal shields from the areas of earliest contact such as New South Wales tend to be the rarer and and more collectable than those from Western Australia. Most tribal shields are sold to collectors of Tribal art because they are a lovely form of Aboriginal art in there own right.

 

 

 

 

 

Wanda Shield

 

Aboriginal Wanda Shield

Wanda Shield

Good old Wanda shields should be very thin and have a curved profile. The better ones tend to be symmetrical with the top half being the same size as the lower half. They were made by the australian aborigines of the of Western Australia.  The fragile nature of these tribal shields often lead to small breaks that would be indigenously repaired leaving one half smaller than the other. The handle on the reverse should be large enough for the hand to fit through. There are more Wanda shields on the market made for sale to tourists than old originals. Old used examples are more valued by a collector. there are two main Forms. A more common form with one z shape motif on the front and a rarer form with many Z shapes.

 

 

La Grange Shields

La Grange shield from Western Australia

La Grange Shield

La grange shields tend to be flat in profile with the front left blank or covered in parallel grooves. The reverse is intricately carved in la grange design similar to pearl shells from the same area. They were made by the Australian aborigines of Western Australia in La Grange bay.  Older tribal shields from this region tend to have larger handles that can be held by the whole hand. Later shields have smaller handles and do not fit comfortably on the hand. The designs on earlier shields tend to be more precise and perfect. The grooves should be continuous and not peter out where the groove angle changes. More intensely designed examples are more collectable. Early shields often have a blank front or parallel grooves.

 

 

 South East Australian Broad Shield

South eastern Australian Broad Shield

A very nice example

The incised designs on the tribal shields of south-eastern Australia mainly feature a diamond figure set in a field of herringbone, and parallel chevron and diagonal flutings. The patterns are usually symmetrical overall. The handles are not made from wood and can quite often become lost

They are amongst the most collectable of Aboriginal tribal shields and certainly the most expensive to collect. Most examples of these shields are 19th century with very few later examples.

The surface of many shields, especially those of the Murray River, is divided into panels separated by plain longitudinal strips of the smooth surface,

The dividing strips are often painted red, and the bas-relief grooved pattern white, forming a simple but effective contrast.

Gulmari Shields

tribal shield from Southern Queensland

Gumari Shield

 

 

Gulmari shields tend to be made from softwood and are crudely painted but otherwise undecorated. They were made by the Australian aborigines of Quennsland. Despite being fairly plain and uninteresting artistically they are a rare form of shield and therefore have collectable value

 

 

 

 

 Queensland Rainforest Shield

Queensland rain Forest shield

Queensland rainforest shield

 

 

Amongst the most beautiful of all the aboriginal shields the rainforest shield is also highly sort after by collectors. They were made by the Australian aborigines of  Northern Queensland. Old shields tend to be larger and have the handle ridge extending from top to bottom. Later shields are smaller and normally have less attractive designs

 

 

 

Parrying Shields

Parrying shield from new south wales

NSW Parrying Shield

 

 

 

Tribal shields for parrying should be strong enough to deflect the blow of a hardwood club. The prettier the designs on the front the better. Parrying shields from Western Australia tend to be less bowed at the front

 

 

Central Desert Aboriginal Shields

Aboriginal shield from the central desert also called Beanwood Shields are amongst the most common and least sort after. They were made by the australian aborigines of the central desert. A good old one can be told from a later example by the outside edges that on older examples tend to curve backwards and then almost face back towards the handle.

Beanwood tribal shield from central Australia

They are more valuable if they have original ceremonial designs on them but beware that some ruthless dealers have been known to add designs to lesser shields.

If you can’t find the shield you are looking for here try Tribal shields from Papua New Guinea.

More Tribal shield Images

Tribal shield from the rainforest of Queensland Tribal Shield from Flinders ranges south Australia Murray River broad shield Western Australian Wanda Shield Unusuaul tribal shield from western Australia tribal Shield Thargomindah Queensland Rainforest shield Shield WA Wunda

 

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Aboriginal pearlshell

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Aboriginal Pearlshell adornments known as Riji or Jakoli  in the Kimberleys (Western Australia) or Longka Longka / Lonka Lonka in Central Australia  have been used since at least 1818. Freycinet records in Shark Bay Western Australia “an old man painted with stripes of various colours and distinguished from the rest by a shell hanging from his girdle. they are an original and unique form of Aboriginal Art.

Aboriginal pearlshell

 

The first illustrated and documented pearl shells were from Broome Western Australia and illustrated and described by Saville-Kent in 1897  The ultimate reference for this unique form of Aboriginal art is a book called Riji and Jakoli by Kim Akerman and John Stanton from which most of the information for this article has been extracted.

I buy Aboriginal Pearlshell. If you have one you would like to sell please contact me

Fortunately for collectors of Aboriginal Art and public Museums these pearl shells are secular in nature and are not Secret or Sacred.

The quality and age of these pearl shells vary widely and old ones are far more valuable than those made recently. The easiest way to explain a great jakoli / lonka lonka is by examples

Adductor Scar

One indicator that the Riji / jakoli / Lonkalonka is of more recent manufacture is that later pieces most often do not have the  Adductor Muscle Scar removed.

tribal pearl shell

 

The above Lonka Lonkas have a large scar where the Abductor muscle attaches the 2 halves of the shell. In The best earliest examples this has been removed by grinding.

 Design 

carved pearlshell

I think it is great that Aboriginal Art is still being made by Aboriginal Artists but it is nice to have the knowledge to tell old from new. Contemporary pieces are often made with symmetrical designs. Note that the hair string is not a good indicator of age.

made for sale example of a carved pearlshell

Obviously made for sale and not traditional use.

 Suspension Holes

Jakoli incised with motifs

More recent aboriginal pearlshells / Jakoli / Lonka Lonka are drilled with  modern tools so the hole tends to be larger and more perfect. Pearl shells used to be drilled from either side and there is often some miss alignment of the holes. Some Pearl shells were not drilled at all but attached to the string by resin. Some old Jakoli were also pierced by sawing two grooves (one on the front and other on the back) at right angles to each other with the hole appearing where they intercept.

FAKES 

example of a pearlshell that was not made by an aboriginal but faked

If a Aboriginal pearlshell looks like it has been carved onto an old pearl shell then it is likely to have been made recently and not necessarily by an aboriginal artist. Old Jakoli lonka lonka were a prized possessions of western Australia Aborigines and were made from new pieces of pristine shell. If you look carefully at the grooves they are not as uniform as on an early shell either.

Pearlshell carved with designs

The grooves on almost all the old ones are about 1-2mm wide and when the grooves get really fine like this I would need to see it in person or just not buy it. Rounded corners are also to be avoided

GENERAL

The meanings of the designs on aboriginal pearlshell vary depending on the region they were collected and the level of initiation the Australian aborigine has undergone. This means that any example may have one meaning while being worn in public but also have a secret private meaning as well.

 

Aboriginal Pearlshell

Aboriginal pearlshell

Of course as with all Aboriginal art there is the ordinary and the extraordinary and for every 20 lonka Lonka that come up for sale only one will stand out from the others and it is these that are by far the most collectable

The main sorce of pearl shell for the manufacture of Jakoli / Riji / lonka lonka is the North West coast of Western Australia between Port headland and the buccaneer Archipelago. From here the pearl shell were distributed along traditional trade routes to as far away as Alice Springs.

Not all pearl shells were engraved but it is definitely the engraved ones that are preferred by collectors. Pearl shell was perceived by aborigines to be associated with water. It was used in Magic rainmaking ceremonies by magicians who bit off pieces of pearl shell in order to make rain. The most common use for a Jakoli / Riji / LonkaLonka though was as a personal adornment marking an initiated Man.

More images of aboriginal pearlshell

pearlshell soth12 1-2, pearlshell soth12 1-2 Pearlshell soth12 2-3 Pearl shell soth 2007 2.1 Pearlshells Pearlshell Pearlshell soth12 2.2 Pearlshell soth12 2.4

 

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Gunwinggu Bark Painting

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Gunwinggu Bark Painting

The style of Gunwinggu  bark painting stems directly from a long history of rock painting. This article describes the features and designs found in Gunwinggu Bark Painting and provides links to 32 major Gunwinggu Bark Painting Artists.

Gunwinggu refers to the language spoken or tribal group of people near Oenpelli

Commonly the background of a bark painting from Gunwinggu has been covered by a reddish Ochre that has been rubbed in. Sometimes the scrapped surface may be left the colour it assumed when it was scorched and straightened over a fire. Bark painting from this region were originally done inside shelters made of bark during the wet season or as rock painting.

 

 

 I Buy Gunwinggu bark painting and if you have one to sell I would love to see it. If you have a bark painting and just want to know what it is worth please feel free to send me a jpeg.

Oenpelli Bark PaintingThe design typically consists of a single figure or a group of figures. The design is boldly outlined in white and stands out clearly from the background. The figures on a bark Painting can be some of the most dynamic and visually intriguing found in Aboriginal Art.

Though there is very little of background detail, the design is often filled in with crosshatching. These figures are distinguished by their roundness and quality of movement. Some bark painting form Oenpelli exhibit a unique x ray technique whereby internal organs – usually of animals fish or pregnant women are depicted. This x-ray style of art is a way Aboriginal Art represent the whole spiritual being on a 2 dimensional surface and not just the beings surface. In some old rock painting it is believed the spirit itself came to rest on the rock and left the depiction of its image. It is also the reason that Oenpelli bark painting are sometimes called X-Ray Bark Painting or x-ray aboriginal art.

Representations of attenuated matchstick figures called Mimi spirits are also found primarily in aboriginal art from Oenpelli. 

Gunwinggu Bark PaintingThe Oenpelli region includes Crocker Island which is home to some of the greatest figurative aboriginal art. The figures on Crocker Island bark Painting are extremely fluid and full of power and mystery.

The Oenpelli region reaches from the East Alligator River to the liverpool Rivers and includes the Coboug Peninsula and Crocker Island and Gouldburn Islands.

Forest plaines which flood in the wet season border the rivers and lagoons which teem with fish. The main settlement is Oenpelli Mission which is about 100 kilometres from the coast near the alligator River. Although as a cattle station it dates back to 1906 it first became the site of a church mission society in 1925. Nowadays aboriginal life centres on the mission station, where cattle are raised and crops are grown.

The Aboriginals of Oenpelli are organised into tribes rather than the smaller clans. Clans commonly trace matrilineal descent. Among them are the Gunwinggu and the Maung. In the Western region occurs the rocky escarpment of the Arnhem land plateau, fissured by chasms and dotted with caves. Evidence of human occupation as long as 20 thousand years ago is reflected in the rock painting. It is one of the oldest living tribal art traditions on earth.

If this post has been informative please take the time and make the effort to share it on social media. By clicking any of the share buttons below you create a link from your social site to this article. Links are what google uses to calculate what information on the web is useful. By sharing this article you are letting google know you found my article / images of some value. Thanks!

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Deijonni Bark painter of the spirits

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Deijonni
Bark Painting

Deijonni is a extremely traditional Bark painter from the Oenpelli Region. His Barks often depict images of the thunder god and have a real archaic power to them.

The aim of this article is to assist readers in identifying if their aboriginal bark painting is by Deijonni by comparing  the few examples of his work.

If you have a Deijonni bark painting to sell please contact me. If you just want to know what your bark painting is worth to me please feel free to send me a Jpeg because I would love to see it.

 

DeijonniDeijonni painted bark paintings in a archaic rock shelter style and is best known for his excellent depictions of the lightning spirit. His depictions are so close to those found in rock shelters that there is little doubt he came from a rock shelter painting background.

Namarrkon is the Lightning Spirit that lives above the clouds and is associated with the intense electrical storms of Kunemeleng, the pre-wet season between October and December. The Spirit is typically illustrated in the rock art and bark paintings of the region with a circuit of lightning encircling its body. Kulbburru, the stone axes protruding from his arms, legs and lower torso are hurled by Namarrkon when marriage taboos or other aspects of tribal law are broken striking the perpetrators of wrongdoing in the form of lightning and causing the sound of thunder that accompany the tropical storms of the region.

Along with many other Arnhem Land Artists who did bark paintings, there is not a lot of information readily available about Deijonni. His Moiety was Dua, his skin was Nangarit and his totem / dreaming was Nabewa (sugarbag) ‘ Wild bee honey. He came from the tribe Malilli who are the traditional owners of the area between Liverpool River and the South Alligator River.  If anyone knows more information about the biography of Deijonni,  please contact me as I would like to add it to this article.

Deijonni Bark painting Images

The following images are not a complete list of bark paintings by Deijonni but give a good feel for the style and variety of this artist
Nym DjimurrgurrNym DjimurrgurrNym DjimurrgurrNym DjimurrgurrNym DjimurrgurrNym DjimurrgurrNym JimunggurNym JimunggurNym Jimunggur

If this post has been informative please take the time and make the effort to share it on social media. By clicking any of the share buttons below you create a link from your social site to this article. Links are what google uses to calculate what information on the web is useful. By sharing this article you are letting google know you found my article / images of some value. Thanks!

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George Milpururu Bark paintings

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George Milpururu
Bark painting

The aim of this article is to assist readers in identifying if their aboriginal bark painting is by George Milpururu by comparing  examples of his work.

If you have a George Milpururu bark painting to sell please contact me. If you just want to know what your bark painting is worth to me please feel free to send me a Jpeg because I would love to see it.

 

 

 

George Milpururu paints in a Central Arnhem land bark painting land style using a combination of solid blocks of colour crosshatching Rarrk and dots. It is Milpururu’s ability to play between foreground and background that characterises his paintings with blocks of flat colour contrasting against intricate rarrk cross-hatching to create a strong graphic effect.       George drew on the traditions of Western Arnhem Land bark painting, who applied cross-hatching solely within the figurative motifs of the work. He also borrowed on the Eastern Arnhem Land convention of leaving figures depicted in plain black against a heavily patterned background.

He often takes a single traditional motif and repeats it across the bark painting as shown in his painting of flying foxes.  The repetition of these images are motifs found in sacred paintings made for ceremonial purposes. George grew up in swamp country in the middle section of the Glyde River. This swamp became the wellspring from which Milpururu’s drew his artistic inspiration. He drew swamp animals including turtles, magpie geese, flying foxes, fish lizards, kangaroo, crocodile goanna and snakes.  His colours are rich and brilliant and his works tend to be more appeal to the mainstream than tribal art collectors.     George Milpururu was raised in his father’s country Ngalyindi on the Ganalbingu outstation near the Arafura swamp.  He began bark painting under the guidance of his father, Nhulmarmar.

 

He first began selling his work in the 1970’s  at Milingimbi. However with the establishment of Bula Bula Aboriginal Art at Ramingining in the late 1970’s, Milpurrurru moved there to advance his artistic career. One of Milpurrurru’s central narratives is that of the Magpie Geese.  At the end of the monsoon period the magpie geese lay their eggs. The Ganalbingu then venture out in stringy bark canoes to hunt the Magpie geese eggs. A ceremony called Gurrumbumbungu is held in conjunction with the hunting to ensure the magpie geese will lay again. During the ceremony men perform the Goose dance with cooked eggs, which are later given to the women to rub over their newborn babies.   Milpurrurru mastered not only painting and dance, but could also fashion his own canoes, woven fish traps and tools. George Milpurrurru and his contemporaries like David Malangi, Jimmy Wululu, and Bob Bilinyara are attributed with placing Central Arnhem Land Aboriginal art firmly on the art map during the 1970’s and 1980’s. He was a ceremonial leader of the Ganalbingu language speaking people, a skilled hunter, amarngitj or traditional healer, a ceremonial singer and dancer. His works were exhibited at the Old Masters Exhibition at the National Gallery of Australia.

George Milpururu Bark Painting images

George MilpurrurruGeorge MilpurrurruGeorge MilpurrurruGeorge MilpurrurruMILPMilpurrurruGeorg_2125105979514George Milpururu

If this post has been informative please take the time and make the effort to share it on social media. By clicking any of the share buttons below you create a link from your social site to this article. Links are what google uses to calculate what information on the web is useful. By sharing this article you are letting google know you found my article / images of some value. Thanks!

 

 

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Nandibita Bark Painting

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Nandibita
Bark painting

Nandibita was born before the first Christian mission was established on Groote Eylandt in 1921, and grew to be a prolific bark painting artist. Very limited information about the life of this artist is available. The aim of this article is to assist readers in identifying if their a bark painting is by Nandibita by comparing  examples of his work

If you have a Nandibita bark painting to sell please contact me. If you just want to know what your Nandabitta painting is worth to me please feel free to send me a Jpeg because I would love to see it.

 

 

maminyamandja Bark paintingNandibita bark paintings are usually on a rectangular bark where the background is painted black. Unlike many early Eland Groote bark painters Nandibita does not just paint a single totemic animal.  His paintings were legend stories of the origins of Anindilyakwa people and their land, as well as historical paintings such as those about the annual visits of Macassan fishermen from Indonesia. Because many of the dreamtime stories involve the same sea animals many of them recur in Nandibita’s works. These include the sawfish, Manta Ray shovel nose shark turtle crab sea snake and crocodile.

A great example of these dreamtime stories by Nandibita is held by the National Gallery of Australia and goes as follows.  The Angurugu River on the western coast of Groote Eylandt was created by three ancestral beings, Yukurrirridangwa the Sawfish, Dumarnindangwa the Manta Ray and Manggabaramerra the Shovel-nosed Shark. These ancestors swam from Blue Mud Bay on the mainland, to the west coast of the island. Upon reaching the island the Sawfish cut a channel in the ground and freshwater gushed out of springs to fill the channel. The Shovel-nosed Shark remained in the river and transformed into a large rock above a site known as Angurugu, while its companions travelled on and finally reached Lake Angurugubira on the east coast.

 

 Nandibita Maminyamandja  Bark Painting Images

The following images are not a complete collection of works by the artist but give a good idea of his style and variety.

Nandabitta bark painting of men and stingrays Nandibitabark painting of fishsawfish being hunted Aboriginal art on barkNandabittaCrabs depicted on aboriginal bark paintingmaminyamandja bark painting of sawfishNandabittaNandibitaAboriginal art Painting of turtles and dolphinsBark painting of a hunting scenenandabitta bark painting of men and birdsBark painting of 2 lizards

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Aboriginal Bark Painting Worksheet

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The following free lesson plan and Aboriginal Bark Painting worksheet are designed for students in years 4 to 6. Please feel free to use the attached Aboriginal Bark Painting Worksheet and adjust the lessons to suit your class environment.

 

Six Aboriginal Bark Painting Worksheets

Click on the image for a easy to print version

 

ABORIGINAL Art for kids BARK PAINTING TURTLE WORKSHEETABORIGINAL art for kids BARK PAINTING BARRAMUNDI WORKSHEETABORIGINAL art for kids BARK PAINTING CROCODILE WORKSHEET

ABORIGINAL art for kids BARK PAINTING BROLGA WORKSHEETABORIGINAL art for kids BARK PAINTING KANGAROO WORKSHEETABORIGINAL art for kids BARK PAINTING LIZARD WORKSHEET

 

 

X-RAY Aboriginal Bark Painting Lesson Plan

STUDENT OUTCOMES

The student:

  • recognises the importance of contributions made by Aboriginal artists;
  • considers popular traditional and contemporary arts, including those from other times and places;
  • understands how Aboriginal arts contribute to the arts in Australian society;
  • gains an understanding that there are a variety of Aboriginal Art Styles from different regions and language groups.
  • gains knowledge of the X Ray style of painting from the Oenpelli Region of Arnhem Land

 

TEACHING RESOURCES/ MATERIALS:

Collection of Bark Painting Pictures

Bark Painting Design Worksheets

Red, Black, yellow and brown sharpened coloured pencils

 

IMPLEMENTATION:

Whole Class.

  • Show students pictures of the Aboriginal Bark Paintings and Rock paintings from the Oenpelli region.
  • Explain to students that some of Australia’s Rock art is older than the pyramids or Stone Henge.  Some Rock Paintings are believed to depict mega Fauna that has been extinct for 30,000 years
  • Explain how aboriginal artists traditionally drew animals as though they could be seen through (just like an X-Ray) and explain this is an artist method of showing an animal is depicted is three dimensionally.
  • Show examples of Xray bark paintings from picture collection
  • .Ask students what main colours are used in traditional x ray paintings and why these colours are used.
  • Show examples of different styles of rarrk line work
  • Discuss the types of markings (Rarrk) – model how they can be drawn.
  • Introduce the Bark Painting Worksheet and Model how to complete/ decorate the animal depicted.
  • Using the printed Worksheets ask the students to  further segment the animal design. Then use only parallel lines or cross hatching (Rarrk) to fill in the animal design sections. Small blocks of colour and dots are also acceptable. Traditionally no more than four colours of earthy tones should be used.
  • Children can choose from the six different animals worksheets supplied.
  • Remind children to use traditional colours and drawing techniques to complete their own x-ray design. The bones in the spine should be left white.
  • At end of the lesson – share designs and compare to Traditional Artist.

 

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

X-Ray style Aboriginal bark painting was traditionally painted on cave walls.

It is at least 7000 years old but probably much older.

The animals depicted are often totem animals sacred to the painter or animals important in an ancestral story.

Traditionally Red and Yellow were made from Ochre, White from Clay and Black from charcoal.

Bark Design Info:

Backbones are traditionally left white with small sections coloured in.

Rarrk (Lines) are fine, delicate and are parallel

Use different cross hatching/ line designs for each section.

 

 

 

Free Teachers Resource Aboriginal Art Bark Painting Activity for Kids

Free Art Lesson Plan

Teachers Resource

Aboriginal Art Activity

Aboriginal Art Worksheet

Bark Painting Worksheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

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